You are listening to Saturday Show Podcast, episode number 111. My name is Frank Marcopolos. I am the author of the novel ALMOST HOME, the short story collection INFINITE ENDING, and the novelettes A CAR CRASH OF SORTS, and WOMYN DO: THE HEALING OF JOHNNY REBEL, all available on Amazon. I am also the former editor and publisher of the respected literary zine, THE WHIRLIGIG. You can find me on twitter, YouTube, or FrankMarcopolos.com, where this podcast feed stems from. It is also available on iTunes, Stitcher, and Google Play Music.

On this episode of the podcast, we will do an analysis of the short story, “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin. This story is in the public domain, and the text is available online. In addition, I have performed an audiobook version of the story which is available on this podcast feed as well as on YouTube, at my channel, http://youtube.com/brooklynfrank.

Quoting Wikipedia now on the basic background of the author: Kate Chopin, born Katherine O’Flaherty (February 8, 1850 – August 22, 1904), was a U.S. author of short stories and novels. She is now considered by some to have been a forerunner of the feminist authors of the 20th century of Southern or Catholic background, such as Zelda Fitzgerald.

From 1892 to 1895, she wrote short stories for both children and adults that were published in such magazines as Atlantic Monthly, Vogue, The Century Magazine, and The Youth’s Companion. Her major works were two short story collections, Bayou Folk (1894) and A Night in Acadie (1897). Her important short stories included “Désirée’s Baby,” a tale of miscegenation in antebellum Louisiana (published in 1893),[1] “The Story of an Hour” (1894),[2] and “The Storm”(1898).[1] “The Storm” is a sequel to “The ‘Cadian Ball,” which appeared in her first collection of short stories, Bayou Folk.[1] Chopin also wrote two novels: At Fault (1890) and The Awakening(1899), which are set in New Orleans and Grand Isle, respectively. The characters in her stories are usually inhabitants of Louisiana.
Within a decade of her death, Chopin was widely recognized as one of the leading writers of her time.[3] In 1915, Fred Lewis Pattee wrote, “some of [Chopin’s] work is equal to the best that has been produced in France or even in America. [She displayed] what may be described as a native aptitude for narration amounting almost to genius.”

Posted by Frank Marcopolos

Frank Marcopolos founded "The Whirligig" literary magazine in 1999, which has been called "a landmark, demonstrating the power of the literary underground." It has been said that "you get this true lion-roaring sense that Editor Frank Marcopolos knows what he likes, and how to read, and how to publish, and he has guts, and eats insects on Wheaties with bleach." His long-form fiction has been reviewed with such praise as "thorough-goingly entertaining" and "highly readable...recalls the style of Michael Chabon or John Irving. A literary gem that should not be missed." A broadcasting-school graduate, his unique literary-audio work has been featured in movie trailers, scholastic environments, and on YouTube, with one of his audiobooks achieving over 100,000 "views" there.