Tag: robert bly


Saturday Show #45: The Advantages of the Well-Read Gentleman

Posted by Frank Marcopolos in Podcast, Saturday Show, Writing Group. No Comments

14th December

China New Star - on Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn

China New Star – on Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn


We—my mom, brother, sister, and I—were enjoying a rare family meal at China New Star Restaurant on Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn. I was trying to explain to them what was so great about Paolo Coehlo’s international bestselling novel, THE ALCHEMIST, which I’d recently read. As I was going through a litany of praises, my sister, the devoted New Kids on the Block fan, sighed as only little sisters can sigh, and said, “If it has this great message about life and stuff, why not just tell us what it is?”

After expressing the exasperation of a big brother exhausted from 30+ years of being exasperated with his younger siblings, I said, “It’s not the same. You can’t just tell someone what the meaning of a great book is. Doesn’t work like that.”

“Why not?” my sister said.

“Because, that’s why,” I said, big-bro brilliant.

The embarrassing fact is, I didn’t know why on that day. But my little sister’s line of questioning stuck with me. As I started thinking more and more about my little sister’s question, I started thinking about the role of fiction in our society, and how it seems that there’s a perception “out there” that fiction is for entertainment purposes only—that it’s not useful for helping us solve the many problems we face.

And that is DEAD WRONG.

Robert Bly says:

“The knowledge of how to build a nest in a bare tree, how to fly to the wintering place, how to perform the mating dance—all of this information is stored in the reservoirs of the bird’s instinctual brain. But human beings, sensing how much flexibility they might need in meeting new situations, decided to store this sort of knowledge outside the instinctual system; they stored it in stories. Stories, then—fairy stories, legends, myths, hearth stories—amount to a reservoir where we keep new ways of responding that we can adopt when the conventional and current ways wear out.”

Once it became clear that great fiction could have a distinctly useful purpose, I sought to find out what some of those purposes could be…

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The audio player above uses Flash. If that don’t suit ya, here is the iTunes.com link. If ya don’t like that, please use the Stitcher player on the top-right sidebar of this page. If that don’t work for ya, uhh, why are you here again?

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Show notes and links:

The Alchemist by Paolo Coelho
Robert Bly – Iron John
David Biddle
Nirvana by Adam Johnson
Find the Bad Guy by Jeffrey Eugenides
Alain Robbe-Grillet
REAL Writers Group – Meetup.com
Paradise Lost – The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills

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Music provided by radiotimes, admiralbob77, and lazztunes_07 of ccMixter.org. Outtro courtesy of melodysheep on YouTube. Liner provided by the lovely and talented (and recently incarcerated) Lady Anarchy, Ms. Amanda Billyrock. Intro voicework by BelindaJoh.

TESTING

The Secret Psychological Structure Behind Interpersonal Interactions

Posted by Frank Marcopolos in Almost Home Novel, Vital Insights. 1 Comment

29th October

Mr. Bly. Genius.

There’s a secret structure to human interactions, and if you don’t know what it is, you’re losing.

Even worse, you’re being laughed at behind your back.

“The knowledge of how to build a nest in a bare tree, how to fly to the wintering place, how to perform the mating dance—all of this information is stored in the reservoirs of the bird’s instinctual brain. But human beings, sensing how much flexibility they might need in meeting new situations, decided to store this sort of knowledge outside the instinctual system; they stored it in STORIES. Stories, then…amount to a reservoir where we keep new ways of responding that we can adopt when the conventional and current ways wear out.” ~ Robert Bly

The secret structure of human relations is revealed by Dr. Paul Dobransky in his groundbreaking work on the “Operating System” of the human mind. [More info here: http://amzn.to/Ro1Oj2 and here: http://www.menspsychology.com/courses/migrowth] As outlined by Dr. Dobransky, people fall into one of four types of temperaments, labeled King, Warrior, Magician, and Lover. Unlike other theories such as Myers-Briggs, Dr. Dobransky’s system allows for human growth, evolutionary development, and the effects of the decisions of free will over time. Meaning, you can determine EXACTLY how well-balanced (or not) you are.

As a disciple of Dr. Dobransky, I have taken this groundbreaking theory and applied it to a fictional setting. Since the system is designed to reveal the exact workings of human “character,” it only makes sense to apply it to fictional characters in a story designed to influence the destiny of the reader. After all, as pre-Socratic philosopher Heraclitus first pointed out, “Character is destiny.”

Almost Home. Bad Title. Great Book.

So, with that as a backdrop, what are some of the themes addressed in ALMOST HOME? They include the following:

– How should you conduct yourself in the face of enormous challenges?
– What is the superior way of dealing with, and vanquishing, our foes?
– What is the one sure-fire way to eliminate failure?
– In our evolution through adolescence, what is the optimal way to transition from youth to adulthood?

And, of course, in terms of style, the novel is written in a fun, emotionally-engaging way that turbo-drives the narrative forward. It combines the techniques of Dwight Swain with the witty humor J.D. Salinger to create a powerful, resonant story—the only sure-fire method humankind has ever created to make life-changing concepts take root in your mind.

And you get all of this in ALMOST HOME for less than a Starbucks coffee. Download it now.

Smashwords.com
Amazon.com
BarnesandNoble.com

“We are still beginners in the labor of learning how to live. We really don’t know what we are doing.” ~ Robert Bly

TESTING

Iron John by the Brothers Grimm

Posted by Frank Marcopolos in Stories. 9 comments

14th June

As translated by Robert Bly.

Additional, recommended resources for enhanced understanding of this fantastic tale:

Iron John: A Book About Men by Robert Bly

From Wild Man to King by Jim Moyers

TESTING